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Myasthenia Gravis


Myasthenia Gravis

Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune neuromuscular disease characterized by varying degrees of weakness of the skeletal (voluntary) muscles of the body. Symptoms vary in type and intensity. The hallmark of myasthenia gravis is muscle weakness that increases during periods of activity and improves after periods of rest. Muscles that control eye and eyelid movements, facial expression, chewing, talking, and swallowing are often, but not always, involved. The muscles that control breathing and neck and limb movements may also be affected.

Myasthenia gravis is caused by a defect in the transmission of nerve impulses to muscles. Normally when impulses travel down the nerve, the nerve endings release a neurotransmitter substance called acetylcholine. In myasthenia gravis, antibodies produced by the body's own immune system block, alter, or destroy the receptors for acetylcholine.

The first noticeable symptoms of myasthenia gravis may be:

  • weakness of the eye muscles

  • difficulty in swallowing

  • slurred speech

Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease because the immune system--which normally protects the body from foreign organisms--mistakenly attacks itself. It is not directly inherited nor is it contagious.

Treatment

Myasthenia gravis can be controlled. Some medications improve neuromuscular transmission and increase muscle strength, and some suppress the production of abnormal antibodies. These medications must be used with careful medical follow up because they may cause major side effects.

Prognosis

With treatment, most individuals with myasthenia gravis can significantly improve their muscle weakness. Some case of myasthenia gravis may go into remission temporarily, and muscle weakness may disappear so that medications can be discontinued. In a few cases, the severe weakness of myasthenia gravis may cause respiratory failure, which requires immediate emergency medical care.

Research

Scientists are evaluating new and improving current treatments for myasthenia gravis. Different drugs are being tested, either alone or in combination with existing drug therapies, to see if they are effective in treating the disorder.

To learn more visit http://www.myasthenia.org/

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